Updates

Alliance Launched To Save Bees

Sixty-five chefs, restaurant owners and other culinary leaders joined us to launch the Bee Friendly Food Alliance. Through the Alliance, chefs and restaurateurs are calling attention to the importance of bees to our food supply, the dramatic die-off of bee populations, and the need to protect our pollinators. LEARN MORE.

News Release | Wisconsin Environment

Report: The Clean Air Act’s Economic Benefits Outweigh Costs by 30 to 1

Madison—Days after the U.S. House passed a funding bill that eviscerates clean air protections in Wisconsin, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency released a report today that highlights the economic and health benefits of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments.

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News Release | Wisconsin Environment

New Report: Wisconsin Remains at risk from Mercury Pollution

Madison, Wisconsin – The Columbia Energy Center power plant in Pardeeville emits 627 pounds of mercury every year [SEE Chart 1 in attached document]—the most in Wisconsin—according to the new Wisconsin Environment report, Dirty Energy’s Assault on our Health: Mercury.

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News Release | Wisconsin Environment

President Obama Highlights Renewable Energy as a Bright Spot in Wisconsin's Economy

MADISON: President Obama travels to Manitowoc on Wednesday to visit Orion Energy Systems as part of his Main Street tour. Ahead of the visit, Orion announced that they expect to increase their operating revenue by 54% in the third quarter compared to the same time period last year.

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News Release | Wisconsin Environment

Wisconsin Environment Responds to President’s State of the Union Address

MADISON: Last night, President Obama delivered his State of the Union address. Wisconsin Environment's Clean Energy Associate Scott Thompson issued the following statement in response:

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Report | Wisconsin Environment Research & Policy Center

Global Warming and Extreme Weather: The Science, the Forecast, and the Impacts on America

Patterns of extreme weather are changing in the United States, and climate science predicts that further changes are in store. Extreme weather events lead to billions of dollars in economic damage and loss of life each year. Scientists project that global warming could affect the frequency, timing, location and severity of many types of extreme weather events in the decades to come. 

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